Happy Hobbit Day!

To celebrate Hobbit Day tomorrow (the birthdays of both Bilbo and Frodo), I would like to share a post I wrote two years ago after the first Hobbit movie came out. There is so much depth in the Hobbits’ simple characters, especially in relation to the others around them – wizards, kings, princes, elf lords etc., that it is an amazing tribute to Tolkien how he weaved these unassuming and lovable creatures into our psyches. This was my tribute to the old professor after the movie. 

Happy Hobbit Day!

THERE ARE NO SPOILERS ABOUT THE MOVIE IN THIS POST.

Last week I blogged about my expectation that a new generation were about to embark on an unexpected journey into the world of epic fantasy as they sat and watched the first Hobbit movie.

I mentioned with pride how my teenage son, moving into social independence, chose to see the movie with me rather than his friends. My first fantasy novel (and the three others to a lesser extent), At The Walls Of Galbrieth, was a joint project, and I identify our mutual love for the genre as one more log to grab as he flows down the river of manhood.

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We sat next to each other and whispered and compared experiences. It was everything a father could hope for.

But it was with my youngest son (10 years old) with whom I had an unexpected experience. I wish to thank the movie theatre for failing to fix the armrest between us (why does this never happen on a date?). We were able to push it up and out of the way and for three hours, we cuddled together as we watched the movie.

While my older son leaned over and whispered whenever he wanted to, I could actually feel my youngest son’s reaction by his body language. I was intrigued. I felt when he tensed, when he was amazed, when he was sad, and when he laughed.

Other people - didn't think my fellow movie-goers would appreciate the flash!

Other people – I didn’t think my fellow movie-goers would appreciate the camera flash in the middle of the movie!

As we made our way home after the movie, my youngest enthusiastically told me about how we should incorporate this or that into the fourth Wycaan Master novel. I think the Tolkien Estate might sue if we did what he was suggesting, but for the moment, I just basked in his enthusiasm.

Another epic fantasy lover. I’m not the greatest father, I know. But this evening I felt I had done my job.

Finally a shout out to Stephen Colbert. Depending on your politics, you may or may not enjoy his nightly show. But he is undoubtedly impressive with his ability to be satirical and hold his own with very high-level guests.

But he outdid himself with a week of tribute to The Hobbit. Turns out, Mr. Colbert is a major Tolkien fan. His elfish sounds polished, and his knowledge of The Professor’s work is awesome.

Colbert and Sir Ian McKellen (Gandalf)

Colbert and Sir Ian McKellen (Gandalf)

Check him out on You Tube – he has a different cast member as guest each night.

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Alon Shalev is the author of At The Walls of Galbrieth, Book 1 of The Wyccan Master series, which reached the Quarter Finals of the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award 2012, released by Tourmaline Books. The First Decree, the sequel is due out in early 2013. Shalev is also the author of three social justice-themed novels: Unwanted Heroes, The Accidental Activist and A Gardener’s Tale. More on Alon Shalev at http://www.alonshalev.com and on Twitter (@elfwriter).

At The Next Dwarf Mine Turn Left.

I came across this great article by Roberta Osborn called How to Create A Map For Your Novel. It is very cool and I strongly recommend to those of you who are fantasy or sci-fi writers and may be considering drawing a map, that you follow the link.

Two other articles that I found are from Fantasy Faction and a low-tech video.

When writing Wycaan Master, I never thought to draw a map. Only when I began to write a sequel and realized that I had to keep my characters following a certain geographical framework did I consider making one.

Given that I have no artistic talent, and that my son who helped me write and edit, better understands which end of a pencil is which, I charged him with the task. Being of prime pre-teen material, he refused. In the ensuing negotiation, we agreed to tackle it together.

We went through the manuscript and highlighted every change in direction, every named mountain range and forest. He then took a piece of paper and began to draw. We were soon off the page and took another piece of paper and, utilizing cutting-edge technology, taped the two pages together. They soon blossomed into several pages at unruly angles one to the other, with absolutely no way the map could be folded.

it was clearly destined to be crumpled, torn, and otherwise abused. Today, it sits somewhere in our humble abode under a pile of mutually discarded papers that are not yet quite trash-worthy. It is a tragic tale.

As I look through the articles above, I am struck with a series of questions for those who read epic fantasy. Remember, that I am new, if enthusiastic, to the genre. If you have the energy please answer any or all of the following questions.

1) Do you look at a map at the beginning of a fantasy novel? If so, how much do you study it?

2) Do you refer back to the map as you read the book?

3) Is there any room in epic fantasy for a GPS?

Answers to the first two questions will be greatly appreciated.

Have a great weekend,

Alon

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Alon Shalev is the author of The Accidental Activist and A Gardener’s Tale. He has written two fantasy novels and the first has reached the Quarter Finals of  the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award as of March 2012. More on Alon Shalev at http://www.alonshalev.com/and on Twitter (@elfwriter).